Akorda – the residence of the President of the Republic of Kazakhstan

(akorda.kz)

Sovereign Kazakhstan’s new capital has a unique architectural ensemble in terms of artistic meaning and scale. An important element of the city’s central area is Akorda – the residence of the President of the Republic of Kazakhstan. The residence is a compositional and conceptual centre of the city’s architecture. The key points of Astana’s design axis are: “Khan Shatyr” – “Bayterek” – “Akorda” – “The Palace of Peace and Accord” – “Kazak Eli”.

This composition visually embodies the ideas of preserving the continuity of the Great steppes’ traditions, promotion of Eurasian culture of tolerance and creation of strong Kazakhstan that aspires to achieve heights of the modern world civilization.

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Astana - the capital of the Republic of Kazakhstan

(akorda.kz)

The idea of creation of a new, modern capital of Kazakhstan belongs to President Nursultan Nazarbayev. On July 6, 1994, the Supreme Council of the Republic of Kazakhstan decided to move the capital from Almaty to Akmola. On December 10, 1997, the capital was officially transferred to Akmola. In line with the Presidential Decree signed on May 6, 1998 Akmola was renamed into Astana. The new capital was unveiled internationally on June 10, 1998. In 1999, Astana was awarded the title of the City of Peace by UNESCO.

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Wikipedia: What is written about Kazakh writers and poets?

Abai Qunanbaiuli

Abay (Ibrahim) Qunanbayuli (Kazakh: Абай (Ибраһим) Құнанбайұлы (info)) (August 10, 1845 – July 6, 1904) was a great Kazakh poet, composer and philosopher. He was also a cultural reformer toward European and Russian cultures on the basis of enlightened Islam.

Early life and education

Abay was born in what is today the selo of Karauyl, in Abay District, East Kazakhstan Province; the son of Qunanbay and Uljan, Qunanbay's second wife, they named him Ibrahim, but because of his brightness, he soon was given the nickname "Abay" (meaning "careful"), a name that stuck for the rest of his life.

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